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Five Words That Signify a Foodstuff in One Latin American Country, But a Crude Term for 'Vagina' in Another

Starbucks' original logo: Perhaps the most-graphic American corporate example of vagina-as-sweet-food EVER
Starbucks' original logo: Perhaps the most-graphic American corporate example of vagina-as-sweet-food EVER

Ya gotta love Latinos. Even though we share the same language (except for those retrograde Brazilians and pinche indios), regional variations lead to more than a few snickers, insults and outright laughter when you get a group of us speaking our Spanish. And nowhere is the embarrassment funnier than when talking about our favorite subjects: food and sex, specifically lady bits.

While food double entendres for the male member exist in Latin American Spanish, they are unimaginative (chorizo, salsicha, gallo, etc.), Meanwhile, we've created a lexicon for words that are a foodstuff in one country but mean "cunt"--not just "vagina," not just "yoni," but the crassest, basest word to describe what gals possess--in another.
1. Panocha

Its food version: a delicious New Mexico pudding (shown above) made from sprouted wheat and panocha, the name for unrefined brown sugar in most of Latin America.
Where it's used as a vulgarity: Mexico.

2. Concha

Its food version: the Mexican pan dulce being held by the tongs in the photo.

Where it's used as a vaginal vulgarity: most of Latin America, not so much for the sweetness of the bread but because concha also means "shell," and . . . yeah.

3. Papaya

Its food version: The fleshy fruit loved around the world.
Where it's used as a vaginal vulgarity: Cuba.


4. Cajeta

Its food version: Mexican version of caramel, usually made from goat's milk.
Where it's used as a vaginal vulgarity: Argentina.

5. Arepa

Five Words That Signify a Foodstuff in One Latin American Country, But a Crude Term for 'Vagina' in Another
Photo by El Jefe

Its food version: A corn dough disc most popular in Colombia and Venezuela.
Where it's used as a vaginal vulgarity: Colombia, but not Venezuela. They're weird--we Mexicans don't call panochas tortillas. I'm not even going to TRY to figure this one out. The others above make some sense, at least.


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