Governor Candidates, Humboldt County Pot Growers Agree: No on Legalization!

Jerry Brown: "I've already indicated that that's not a provision I am likely to support."
Jerry Brown: "I've already indicated that that's not a provision I am likely to support."

The Regulate, Control and Tax Cannabis Act of 2010 was certified for November's ballot this week after backers turned in signatures from hundreds of thousands of California voters, but the three top candidates for governor on that same ballot oppose legalization, reports the Sacramento Bee.

Who knew the straights would be on the same page as Humboldt County pot growers?

Meg Whitman is "absolutely against legalizing marijuana for any reason," says her spokeswoman. Steve Poizner "feels we need an across-the-board tax cut to reignite our state's economy, not an attempt to smoke our way out of the budget deficit," according to his communications director.
Meg Whitman is "absolutely against legalizing marijuana for any reason," says her spokeswoman. Steve Poizner "feels we need an across-the-board tax cut to reignite our state's economy, not an attempt to smoke our way out of the budget deficit," according to his communications director.
Steve Poizner photo by Jack Gould

If California legalizes marijuana, crop prices will drop and the livelihoods of outlaw growers will be damaged, as will the entire economy along the state's rugged northern coast, say the growers in this report carried by the Associated Press.

"The legalization of marijuana will be the single most devastating economic event in the long boom-and-bust history of Northern California," adds 62-year-old Anna Hamilton, a Humboldt County radio host and musician who said that her involvement with marijuana has mostly been limited to smoking it for the past 40 years.

Upcoming Events

Even if the measure passes, intense attempts will be made to repeal it, according to Robert MacCoun, a UC Berkeley law professor and drug policy expert.

"The pressure on the Obama administration to try to block this or resist it is going to be enormous," MacCoun tells the San Jose Mercury News. "It's very hard for a single state to pass a law like this and implement it."

There are also fears that the referendum could trigger a backlash against Proposition 215, the Compassionate Use Act.

But the Merc also chatted up advocates who do not fear legalization.

"The federal government is going to allow the state of California to move forward with this," said Salwa Ibrahim, spokeswoman for the pro-legalization campaign. "We're not worried about it."

"We do have the right to legalize," remarked Assemblyman Tom Ammiano (D-San Francisco), who has sponsored a separate decriminalization bill, "even with the federal law as it is."


Sponsor Content

Newsletters

All-access pass to the top stories, events and offers around town.

  • Top Stories
    Send:

Newsletters

All-access pass to top stories, events and offers around town.

Sign Up >

No Thanks!

Remind Me Later >