Playwright Samuel Hunter's characters are ordinary people with ordinary problems: mortality, illness, loneliness, figuring out how to get from Point A to Point C with no idea where Point B is. But Hunter raises the ordinariness of his characters to extraordinary status. That's both a testament to his dramatic skill as well as the latest evidence that the stories we tell ourselves about Americans don't have to be confined—as so many of Hunter's predecessors and peers do—to cultured, articulate, big-city types who whine and fret about their respective angst or to the... More >>>