10 Reasons the Misfits are Still Relevant

10 Reasons the Misfits are Still Relevant

So what they only have one original member left? The Misfits are still one of the most important punk bands of all time, and they're at the Observatory for three nights this weekend.

Before you go check them out, here are 10 reasons the Misfits are still relevant.

10. They created the devilock. Jerry Only is the lone remaining original Misfit, but he's also the one who created the band's iconic hairstyle. Since the Misfits gained popularity over three decades ago, punks, goths, and various other black-clad aesthetically rebellious rockers have pulled their hair to a point in front of their faces, and it's all because of Only. Is it for everyone? Of course not, but it's a beloved statement by those who wear it.

9. A ridiculous amount of bands have covered them.

You don't like the Misfits? That's unfortunate, because if you like any other rock bands, they've probably played at least a song or two by the legendary punk group. Everyone from Metallica and Jawbreaker to Guns 'n' Roses and Green Day have put their own spins on Misfits songs. If it's good enough for them, maybe it should be good enough for you.

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8. It took them almost two decades to release Static Age. Outside of Chinese Democracy (and Dr. Dre's Detox, if we're counting the hip-hop world), few albums experienced the delay that Static Age did. The album was recorded in 1978 (before the band became known through records like Walk Among Us) but not released until 1997 (after the band reunited). Many fans would argue that it's one of their best albums, and one can only speculate how it could've helped blow up their career if it'd been released as their debut.

 

10 Reasons the Misfits are Still Relevant

7. The shadow of Glenn Danzig no longer hangs over them. Sure, Glenn Danzig is probably the most famous thing to come from the Misfits. His hit "Mother" is probably better known than any Misfits song, and he's definitely the most recognizable name from the band's history. That said, his infamous "fights" and other debacles have made him as much a YouTube joke as an aging rock star. The Misfits don't need Danzig, and Danzig doesn't need the Misfits, so it's probably better for everyone if the two stay away from each other for now.

6. Almost every song is a sing-along.

Do most good Misfits songs sound kind of the same? Yes. Is there anything wrong with that? No. The songs might be a little fast to catch on the first time you hear them, but after a few listens, you'll get at least the anthematic choruses down. There's nothing quite like screaming "Mommy, can I go out and kill tonight?!" in unison with hundreds of other permission-concerned possible murderers.

5. They're the go-to band for punk snobbery. Everyone knows that one person who loves to brag about being more knowledgeable in their chosen type of music than everyone else. In the punk world, many of those snobs use the Misfits as the first baseline of bragging rights. It's easy to say that London Calling is your favorite Clash album (even if it shouldn't be), but can you make an argument for your favorite Misfits B-side from their collectors' sets? Even if the Misfits aren't your favorite punk band, if you're going to be dealing with douchey rock historians, they're one of the bands you have to know at least a little about.

4. Your favorite punk band draws from them. Aside from being one of the most important punk bands for music snobs and historians, they were also extremely influential for many of the genre's groups that came after them. Listen to the first four Misfits albums and see if you can honestly tell yourself that punk bands of the last two decades didn't take anything from those records. Both stylistically and musically, the Misfits changed the game for punk rock, and so many bands took from them that it's strange to think where the genre would be without them.

 

3. Sci-fi and horror never go out of style.

Did the Misfits write songs about trends and girls? Only if you count death as a trend and zombies for girls. The best Misfits stuff is all about the types of topics usually reserved for horror and sci-fi movies, whether it's "Astro Zombies," "Braineaters," or "Teenagers from Mars," some things pretty much always remain the same. If aliens ever become widely accepted and integrated into human culture, some of the Misfits stuff will probably seem pretty racist (or species-ist?), but it's all relatively timeless until then.

2. Walk Among Us is one of the best punk albums of the '80s. Was the '80s the best decade for punk rock? You could argue that one for days on end. Regardless of your belief on that subject, it's tough to say that Walk Among Us isn't as close to a perfect punk album as you're going to get from any era. A lot of punk albums hit that lull in the middle where they branch out too far from their roots, or some just have a handful of songs that aren't worth listening to. Walk Among Us has neither of these problems, nor does it have any other major issues. It's a classic.

1. Their logo is everywhere. That kind of cartoonish skull that every punk rock and skater kid had on their clothing, backpack and/or notebooks in high school? Yeah, that's the Misfits. Even if you don't know any of their songs, you undoubtedly know their logo. For that matter, if the Misfits sold an album for every one of their skull designs drawn, sold, or used somewhere, they'd probably be up there among the best-selling artists in history.

See also 10 Punk Albums to Listen to Before You Die 10 Goriest Album Covers 10 Most Satanic Metal Bands

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