Best of OC

Best Of 2007


  • + Aliso Viejo
  • + Anaheim
  • + Arcadia
  • + Avalon
  • + Azuza
  • + Bakersfield
  • + Balboa
  • + Bellflower
  • + Beverly Hills
  • + Brea
  • + Buena Park
  • + Burbank
  • + Cabazon
  • + Capistrano Beach
  • + Carlsbad
  • + Carson
  • + Cerritos
  • + Chatsworth
  • + Chino Hills
  • + Claremont
  • + Colton
  • + Corona
  • + Corona Del Mar
  • + Costa Mesa
  • + Coto de Caza
  • + Covina
  • + Culver City
  • + Cypress
  • + Dana Point
  • + Diamond Bar
  • + Downey
  • + El Segundo
  • + Encino
  • + Escondido
  • + Fallbrook
  • + Fontana
  • + Foothill Ranch
  • + Fountain Valley
  • + Fresno
  • + Fullerton
  • + Garden Grove
  • + Gardena
  • + Glendale
  • + Granada Hills
  • + Hawaiian Gardens
  • + Hermosa Beach
  • + Highland
  • + Huntington Beach
  • + Indio
  • + Irvine
  • + Julian
  • + La Canada Flintridge
  • + La Habra
  • + La Jolla
  • + La Mirada
  • + La Palma
  • + Ladera Ranch
  • + Laguna Beach
  • + Laguna Hills
  • + Laguna Niguel
  • + Lake Forest
  • + Lakewood
  • + Las Vegas
  • + Lawndale
  • + Lomita
  • + Long Beach
  • + Los Alamitos
  • + Los Angeles
  • + Malibu
  • + Manhattan Beach
  • + Marina Del Rey
  • + Maywood
  • + Midway City
  • + Mission Viejo
  • + Montclair
  • + Mountain Center
  • + Mt Baldy
  • + Newport Beach
  • + North Hollywood
  • + Northridge
  • + Norwalk
  • + Oceanside
  • + Orange
  • + Out of Town
  • + Palos Verdes Peninsula
  • + Panorama City
  • + Paramount
  • + Pasadena
  • + Pioneertown
  • + Placentia
  • + Pomona
  • + Portola Hills
  • + Rancho Cucamonga
  • + Rancho Palos Verdes
  • + Rancho Santa Margarita
  • + Redlands
  • + Redondo Beach
  • + Riverside
  • + Rossmoor
  • + Rowland Heights
  • + San Bernardino
  • + San Clemente
  • + San Diego
  • + San Francisco
  • + San Juan Capistrano
  • + San Marino
  • + San Pedro
  • + Santa Ana
  • + Santa Monica
  • + Seal Beach
  • + Sherman Oaks
  • + Sierra Madre
  • + Signal Hill
  • + Silverado
  • + Solana Beach
  • + South El Monte
  • + South Gate
  • + South Pasadena
  • + Stanton
  • + Studio City
  • + Sunset Beach
  • + Temecula
  • + Torrance
  • + Trabuco Canyon
  • + Tustin
  • + Twentynine Palms
  • + Universal City
  • + Unknown
  • + Venice
  • + Villa Park
  • + Westminster
  • + Whittier
  • + Wilmington
  • + Woodland Hills
  • + Yorba Linda
Map It

Food & Drink

People & Places


Best Of :: People & Places

Dave Serranos' Best

Dave Serrano accomplished great things as head coach of the remarkable 2007 UC Irvine baseball team. The Anteaters made their first College World Series appearance, and against the odds, they dug in, even in extra-, extra- (seriously, extra-) inning games to make their mark on a national scale. Even amid rumors of defection to division rival Cal State Fullerton, the embattled father of three pledged as recently as Aug. 31, "I have no interest in leaving UC Irvine for Cal State Fullerton." Sweet. Done and do—

What's that? Dave Serrano just accepted the head coaching position at Cal State Fullerton? Whaaaa?!

Well, we were going to write about how Coach Serrano built the foundation for the continuing greatness of Irvine baseball, and he has, but now it looks like he won't be raising any roofs there. He's headed back up Interstate 405 (or Highway 73, you know, depending on the traffic).

Serrano signed a four-year contract with the Titans. It's hardly surprising he took the job: He played there, he coached there, and now he'll be taking over one of the most renowned college-baseball programs in the country.

He makes the move while he's at the top of his profession (2007 Baseball America Coach of the Year). Indeed, he'd already had a storied career in Orange County, going back to his days as pitching coach for Fullerton. And he leaves behind a team in great shape: The 'Eaters are now ranked No. 2 in the "Top Ten Rising Programs," according to, a popular college-sports website, which should set up a nice little rivalry for next year and beyond.

Serrano and his wife, Tracy, have three children, all boys less than 12 years old, perfect for shagging balls in the outfield. Yes, he's a nationally recognized coach of a nationally ranked team, but when it comes down to it, he's probably a lot like your dad. He loves his kids, the beach and a good burger, and we're guessing he just wants some peace and quiet.

Whew!Okay, now let's get this to print before he heads to Cal State Long Beach.

1. Orange County in general: "I think it's a first-class place to live, raise a family, go to school. There are great choices in the county to go to; we're very spoiled to live in such a great, safe county."

2. The coast: "We definitely go to Newport Beach in the summer."

3. & 4. Sharky's and the Steelhead Brewery: "We eat at . . . a variety of places, really. If we're eating out as a family, there are so many places, great places. We don't go to the finest places to eat, more like places you can go to with small children." Sharky's Woodfired Mexican Grill, 21119 Newport Coast Dr., Newport Beach, (949) 729-1000; Steelhead Brewery, 4175 Campus Dr., Irvine, (949) 856-2227.

5. & 6. University Hills(an Irvine community for UC Irvine faculty and staff) and the Irvine Spectrum: "I don't get a lot of evenings off, but when I do, I spend it with my kids—three young boys—and my wife. . . . . Mostly, we stay within the county." Irvine Spectrum, 71 Fortune Dr., Irvine.

7. UC Irvine: "UC Irvine is attractive to any recruitable athlete. It's a great institution for athletics, but we want to make an impact on our players' lives for a long time. There are a low percentage of players who will be able to move up and play in the pros; we want them to get a chance to be successful in life. We devote a lot of time to these young men, both academically and professionally. That's where our success comes from: We surround ourselves with good people."

7a. [Though we couldn't get back to Serrano by press time, we assume the same quote, or something very much like it, applies to Cal State Fullerton.]

Anh Dos' Best

Anh Do has no qualms about referring to her late father, Yen Do, in the present tense. "My father values people over profit," she says. " And he values the community over the individual. I have those sentiments. I think that's what he teaches me all the time."

Despite his death last year, theirs is an ongoing conversation that began in 1978, when Yen Do enlisted Anh and his other children to help bundle stacks of his nascent newspaper, Nguoi Viet Daily News, in the family's garage. Yen Do had been a reporter in Vietnam before coming to the U.S. with his wife and four children as part of the first wave of refugees after the Vietnam War. The family moved from one refugee camp to another before being adopted by a family in Santa Rosa, who helped them get on their feet.

Once they were on their own, Anh remembers a busy, vibrant home in constant flux. "There were lots and lots of refugees. My parents took in all these people coming over," she says. "We shared everything. We never had our own room or toys. For me, that was normal."

Throughout these years, her father harbored the dream of launching his own newspaper for the many Vietnamese refugees in the country. Anh says her mother worked full-time in the electronics business so that her father could hatch his first edition of the paper, whose name means "Vietnamese people," in 1978. "Her paycheck provided for all of us; the paper didn't provide any money," says Anh of the early years.

But her memories of helping her father bundle stacks of paper and the books and refugee friends that continually filled the Do home have served as her inspiration for the writing and community-relations work she does today. (In addition to writing for Nguoi Viet, she is a guest columnist for The Orange County Register.)

Anh is not editor in chief nor CEO of Nguoi Viet, preferring instead to maintain her close ties to the community as vice president of community relations. "I think I'm the public face of the company in the greater community," she says. People tie her and her father together, she says, and that helps maintain the paper's reputation as a place not only for news, but also for community.

"I see myself as a connector," she says. "I try to stay ahead of what's going on with the Vietnamese community, the greater Asian community and the greater community as a whole. . . . I offer Nguoi Viet as a solution to help [people] meet the people they need to meet and launch the ideas they want to launch."

Here are seven of Anh's favorite things about OC:

1. The soil: "Things grow here. People grow here. I've seen it all my life."

2. "Pacific Coast Highway on a SoCal day. Escaping with our dogs, peeking out of the window for a good whiff."

3. "The dessert case at Zov's Bistro." 17440 17th St., Ste. B, Tustin, (714) 838-8855.

4. Bolsa Avenue: "Mornings, in the embrace of Little Saigon, when your chances of finding a parking space increase so much more."

5. The abundance of grocery stores: "It helps to track down any ingredient on earth."

6. Plentiful restaurants: "Every week I try a new one."

7. "The fact that my parents live here."

Best Altarpiece

If you're going to fall to your knees in front of something representing the highest power, it better be something pretty darn bitchen. The folks at Mission Basilica San Juan Capistrano must have had this in mind when they commissioned 85 craftsmen in Spain to create the Grand Retablo, the massive golden altarpiece that adorns the mission chapel today. A very grand $2 million was poured into this masterpiece of Brazilian cedar and 24-karat-gold flakes, which stands more than four stories high and is adorned with swallows and saints. It brought tears to the eyes of parishioners when it was unveiled in March, and rightfully so.

Best Angels Player

Vladimir Guerrero gets the big money, Francisco Rodriguez sports the cool goggles, and Orlando Cabrera deserves all your love after that All-Star Game snub. But the man who embodies why your Anaheim Angels are no longer a pendejada is Reggie Willits. He's homegrown, not brought in as a free agent; a scrapper, not naturally gifted; humble, a sleeper prospect and plays the small ball the way the Los Angeles Dodgers did for years and are starting to do again. His unlikely storyan Oklahoma stopgap for oft-injured outfielder Garrett Anderson who built his home around a batting cagehas already graced the pages of The New York Times and the blathering tubes of ESPN. More important, though, the squirt has continued to hit above .290 through this long, hot summer. Finally, someone at whom fans can chant "Reg-gie, Reg-gie!" who actually deserves it.

Best Batting Cages

Ahh, the batting cages. The underachieving brother of the driving range, the redneck cousin of the racquetball court, the Okie-in-law of the lap pool. When it comes to solitary versions of large-scale sports, it doesn't get much better than the batting cages, does it? And batting cages don't get much better than Boomers. Whether you need a few brush-up swings, or you're working on your comeback, la The Natural, Boomers' cages have everything you'll need. Grab Wonderboy, or one of the battered aluminum sticks they've got behind the counter, and go rope a few: 70-mph stingers, fast pitch, slow pitch, softballeven bumper boats! Ahem, not that that has anything to do with batting cages; they're just fun, okay? Buy 30 pitches for 2 bucks, or have your own personal home-run derby with an hour's worth. Sure, you'll have a monster blister, but that's what all those skeeball tickets are for: the free batting gloves! Do yourself a favor: Get in good with the staff, and when that time comes along in your life that leaves you at your most desperate, you'll be able to get a job working the cages. It's a step up from the ball-shagger on the driving range, and you'll get the respect of a carnybut with more permanence.

3405 Michelson Dr., Irvine, 92614
Best Building
Taco Bell Discovery Science Center

Admit it: The first time you drove past that giant, angled black cube beside Insterstate 5, you thought the actual kids' museum it belongs to was inside. Later, maybe you caught the light shining through it, realized it was hollow, and wondered what the point was. Did the designer of the Discovery Center just really, really like Pink Floyd and somehow figured kids could learn about the actual dark side of the moon? Turns out it's actually a massive solar-panel array that powers the museumif you pay admission, you can find out all the groovy details and, yes, even get inside it. If solar power is indeed the future, could it be that one day we'll all have trippy black cubes attached to our homes? We can but hope.

2500 N. Main St., Santa Ana, 92705

Dave Serranos' Best: 7 Favorite Things


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