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Amy Nicholson

Amy Nicholson

Amy Nicholson is chief film critic for L.A. Weekly. Her reviews and stories appear in all Voice Media Group publications, and she co-hosts the weekly Voice Film Club podcast. Nicholson holds a double B.A. in film studies and anthropology from the University of Oklahoma as well as a master’s in professional writing from USC. Her criticism has been recognized by the Los Angeles Press Club and the Association of Alternative Newsmedia, and her first book, Tom Cruise: Anatomy of an Actor, was recently published by Cahiers du Cinema. Reach her on Twitter at @theamynicholson.

Popular Stories

Latest Stories

  • 6 days ago | Film and TV

    The biggest story at this year's Sundance Film Festival was the record-breaking bidding war for The Birth of a Nation, a prestige biopic about rebellious slave Nat Turner. When Fox Searchlight snatched it for $17.5 million — $5 million more than a...

  • 7 days ago | Film and TV

    Three years ago, Michael Moore wrapped up a TV interview about the Sandy Hook massacre and asked the producers to leave him alone. “You guys call me every time there's a school shooting,” he sighed. He had, after all, made Bowling for Columbine, w...

  • Benghazi is a hashtag battle cry, a call to arms that many Americans don't understand. Unlike the simplicity of "Remember the Alamo!" a bleat of "Benghazi!" still has people wondering, "Wait, what happened? And why are we...

  • 26 days ago | Film and TV

    Benghazi is a hashtag battle-cry, a call to arms that many Americans don't understand. Unlike the simplicity of “Remember the Alamo!” a bleat of “Benghazi!” still has people wondering, “Wait, what happened? And why are we mad?” Michael Bay's 13 Ho...

  • Benicio Del Toro has the basset-hound look of a beast you can trust -- or, at least, he'll happily admit when he's lying. He's the right man for a rotten world, with heavy-lidded, handsome eyes made for giving any tough spot an appraising squint....

  • In the opening shot of Tim Blake Nelson's Anesthesia, the great character actor's fifth and most ambitious film as a writer-director, the screen is suddenly filled with the face of an old man (Sam Waterston) crossing a New York street....

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