Do Mexicans Think Educated Mexicans Are Sissies?

[¡Ask a Mexican!] And is a picture of chickens wearing sombreros racist?

DEAR MEXICAN: Our graphic artist walked out of the room pissed the other day because the publisher asked my opinion of a Cinco de Mayo advertisement they were planning to run. The graphic showed a row of chickens with sombreros. The publisher asked if I thought it was funny or racist; I said, "Racist." Later, when they decided to publish it anyway, the proofreader (who is black) had the same reaction—funny, but it was racist because it played on stereotypes. The graphic artist, who is white, took offense over the observation, asking me if I boycott Mexican restaurants that display sombreros. I don't go to many Mexican restaurants—not because of the stereotypes, but rather because the food is usually watered down to fit the taste buds of gabachos. Anyhow, my question is: Is it me, or is it that people of non-color just don't get it?

Graphically Angry

DEAR POCHO: The biggest problem here is that your graphic designer thought putting sombreros on chickens for a Cinco de Mayo celebration was clever. He's not racist; he's just a lazy pendejo who deserves to get fired for his incompetence. But to your point: Of course gabachos will never think their stereotypes of Mexicans are racist—but a lot of Mexicans also think stereotypes of Mexicans are hilarious. Hell, how else do you explain the popularity of this column—or George Lopez, who just happens to own the TV rights to this column? Come on, George: Let's get this fiesta started with tequila shots in a Canadian casino!

*     *     *

DEAR MEXICAN: It occurred to me that one of the reasons we Mexicans are taking our time reaching our academic potential is an unspoken fear of feminization. There is a phobia that education and the mannerisms that come with it are emasculating. Would you agree?

Brown, Down and No Clown

DEAR POCHO: "What a question!" responds the Mexican's go-to Mexican for philosophical insights into mexicanidad, San Diego State professor William Nericcio, author of the scabrous Tex(t)-Mex: Seductive Hallucinations of the "Mexican" in America. "My first reaction was that I was going to write, 'I absolutely disagree.' But then the waves of memory hit me, plunging me into a fetid pool of negative nostalgia. In Laredo, Texas, growing up, I can't count the times I was called out as a joto, a maricón or a 'fucking puto' for doing well in school—and this was in a pretty well-respected Catholic high school. Now, Laredo in the 1960s and '70s was not progressive when it came to gender politics, and you can guarantee the homophobic labels tossed at me and other bookheads was a form of linguistic emasculation. The only thing that really saved me was that my love of rock, alternative media and comic books gave me some breathing room.

"I am really thrown by this question—I don't think it is so much a 'fear of feminization' as much as it is an embracing of a macho ideal that will have no truck with books (because women were not spending so much time with books and learning, either). 'Feo, fuerte y formal' was the mantra of Northern Mexico and South Texas, a world of ranchers, negocio and heat—always the heat. To be ugly (think Charles Bronson), strong and formal (which means you have your shit together, solid—not necessarily formal, in the English sense) was an ideal that left no room for bookish indulgence. This is a great, great question—as evidenced by my inability to answer it well!"

Hey, Nericcio: I don't pay you the big shameless plugs for a half-assed answer! Shall I go find another scholar at Scholar Depot?

 
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86 comments
viris_18
viris_18

The Cinco de Mayo poster is wrong because of the use of a military Mexican celebration used to depict such absurd stereotypes.

Leeroy Munoz Torres
Leeroy Munoz Torres

Lol. Maybe if the chicken was eating watermelon and drinking grape soda. Pinchee jente have to lighten up on PC comments.

Antonio Maldonado
Antonio Maldonado

Fuck sensitivity.... If one is solid in their own body and mind with regard of who they are and where they come from, a picture such as the one mentioned would be a head shaker but nothing to get up in arms about. It's a racial world out there, a lot of it is hidden nowadays because of a perceived tolerance towards it.

Alicia Ocampo
Alicia Ocampo

There is all kinds of racist just because you encounter one certain race more others you shouldn't start insult everyone smh

Magali Van Keer
Magali Van Keer

Very OC question! Open your mind please! Our debate - a European citizen -

Steve SanFilipo
Steve SanFilipo

Oh, the irony. In one email to Gustavo a guy bitches about racism and then says this: "I don't go to many Mexican restaurants—not because of the stereotypes, but rather because the food is usually watered down to fit the taste buds of gabachos." Classic.

Steve SanFilipo
Steve SanFilipo

No doubt, Gabe. Remember your roots, keep it real, and stay in North County.

Succass
Succass

It surprises me that the an Educated publisher would ask for an opinion in regards to the drawing..is it because hes is not bios? or because he did feel it may cause an offense to publish the drawing..Either way he and Hollywood will always take the controversial route it seems to bring more attention these days and it does a great job in killing the moral of people...Which brings me to my opinion..it does not matter if you are an educated latino that will have to leave behind his traditions and home taught values to fit in with the "Sucksex full Crowd" which seems to happen in the U.S Alot and most of all in Mexico..I am a U.S Born Nationalized Mexican that has lived in Mexico for 7 years and I have worked for U.S companies that hire predominantly...light skin educated Mexicans that have thier heads in the clouds of someday living in Canada or Europe..most of which come from Middle Class families or Corrupted families that live of stolen money from the laundering pieces of shit they call politicos...So they are bios against real Mexicans that are of darker skin and less opportunity, that have the same education as them..So there is a reason why the people with less opportunity have feeling towards those that have an education..it is only because they tend to sell out the system that has corrupted Mexico for decades!..So YES they are putos..

Gabriel Madrigal
Gabriel Madrigal

It will take one or two more generations to breed the "I love being a pendejo" out of our people.

Gabriel Madrigal
Gabriel Madrigal

Like someone already said, many forget their roots and take refuge in the ivory coasts of south OC

Martin Flores
Martin Flores

Lol sorry your dad is probly a paisa ass prick like those guys at the job site trying to milk the company by working slow as hell drinking beer on the job site, leaving trash etc etc fucking spick

Jose Narez
Jose Narez

Mexicans are only racist towards other races like blacks especially. You're probably a lazy piece of shit and that's why they don't like you.

Alonso Ramirez
Alonso Ramirez

I dislike the fact that people think of assimilating a culture as becoming "white washed."

Rodriguez Liz
Rodriguez Liz

Hell no .. My man has his Bachelors and is working on getting his masters , nothing like an intelligent , hard working man :)

Victor Salas
Victor Salas

What makes a picture of sombrero wearing chickens racist? It would be different if the chickens where depicted doing something stereotypical, but to get all pissed about it because they're wearing sombreros is pretty stupid. I doubt anyone would get uppity if it was a cat; dog or any other animal. And before anyone says: what about a chihuahua? People shouldn't get pissed at that, since that dog breed originated in the Americas.

Rolando Kush
Rolando Kush

Most turn white wash and sadly forget about their rich heritage sad .

BillxT
BillxT topcommenter

I'm sure the latinos working along side me getting their $85k to $100k salaries will put up with being called jotos by the machos dish-washers.

Isaac Romero
Isaac Romero

Great question, and depressingly the anticipated answer.

legallybrownvet
legallybrownvet

Currently in Mexico on family business and I can affirm that the education system here is a disgrace. It is as much a fault of the system as is of the parents. The system loves their days off for whatever reason and teachers that just don't show up. Very party people. They also  have no system to evaluate a student to determine whether they deserve to go to the next grade. I know of many that do not got to school the whole year and yet they are allowed to  move on. Parents sometimes protest but to no avail. Sad to say the least. Also many parents just don't send kids to school, many times just simply because they didn't get up or didn't feel like getting them ready. 

Susan Garcia
Susan Garcia

Hey Ask A Mexican, be careful when you come to AZ they may not like a mexican like you..

lavirgo67
lavirgo67

I have worked with Spanish speaking families in the school system as a case manager & family support liaison.  I've mostly worked with Mexican families and here is what I have experienced.   The majority of people that come to the US from Mexico, as undocumented workers, tend to have very limited education.  Back in Mexico they had few opportunities for well paying jobs due to their lack of education, which was a result of being poor or not having access to schools.  They  come to the US  to find a better life with little to no education.   I've met many families where neither parent went beyond the 5th grade.  They don't really encourage their children in their education because they don't know how to support them with homework or their studies, so they let it slide by the way side.   Mexicans that have had the opportunity to finish high school or go beyond either don't leave Mexico or they come to the US and do well by being able to get into managerial positions or better (they tend to speak English).  This group encourages their children to do well in school.      I'm blessed to come from a Mexican family that values education.     Being called a 'mal educado' or 'burro' were fighting words in my family.  I never once heard anyone put down a young man or woman for wanting to further their education, because it was an investment.  My tios would come home from el campo, changarro or office and tell my cousins to do well in school.     My mom is the only one of her family that moved to the US after meeting my father here in the US (she had come up to learn English).  The rest of the family is down in Mexico living a solid middle-class existence.   I was educated in the US all of my life, but when we travelled to Mexico we saw what hitting the books meant (we didn't see that in our classrooms back in the US barrio).  My cousins studied all summer to pass exams to get into college or better schools.  They had to buy their supplies, uniforms and books, which shocked us because we got it free back home.  My aunts & uncles sacrificed everything to make sure that all of my cousins had their education.   Because of this they were able to move up the social economic ladder.  The majority of my cousins are in professional careers.  My aunts & uncles take great pleasure in hanging their children's degrees on their living room walls for all to see.   Each house is blessed with their share of doctors, lawyers, engineers, teachers, one nutritionist, nurses, architects, business degrees, etc.   Some of my cousins now have children starting their own professional careers and not one of them speaks of coming to the US.

oldollie
oldollie

So, he starts his first paragraph, by whining about purported insensitive racist stereotypes (while finding no ill intent) and ends it by using a bigoted racist slur, calling white people "gabachos"(literally "frogs," but commonly used as an anti-white racist insult).

I quit reading after that. He can burn in hell for all I care.

Jeff O'Brien
Jeff O'Brien

I'd have shown the chickens refusing to wear the sombreros. THAT would be funny

Ramon Altamirano
Ramon Altamirano

You are valued and respected when you create jobs and a wealth legacy for your progeny.

Ramon Altamirano
Ramon Altamirano

There is a lot to be said about educated Mexicans and Latinos. My confirmed fear is that many linger in the safe confines of academia instead of exposing your training in running businesses and mentoring in these competitive wealth building endeavors instead of looking for a cushy job working for government.

gus_in_a_bunny_suit
gus_in_a_bunny_suit

What I'd like to know is why 'dreamers' get free college while US middle class students have to take out student loans. ….it's not right. the debt is crushing. 

Lisa Mendoza
Lisa Mendoza

HaHa, Hector Bojorquez...That's what you got out of Hunger of Memory (ha, I'm still laughing). Richard wrote that when he was young; and I always assumed that he would have realized, by now, that he wasn't given anything. Everything he believed was given to him; he earned 5 times over. Elitism doesn't question privilege. Elitism feels entitled. Which idiot professor's critique did you read (ha, I'm laughing at you again)?

Midnite Rondevu
Midnite Rondevu

No wonder...that they all know I drive for a living....but STILL ask me : Don't you work?. ....

Hector Bojorquez
Hector Bojorquez

Ask a Mexican Maybe in the past--but I do a LOT of work in the Valley- with immigrants and community based organizations that do amazing work (private message me for details) and I have yet to hear a Mexican in the valley be anti-intellectual. Maybe in the past -- where there was a fear of losing identity in the face of oppression-- there were some conflicts---- but even then- Mexicans have a long tradition of liking intellectuals more than Americans. In Mexico- we call everyone 'maestro' who is skilled. There may have been circumstances where people associated intellectualism with effeteness -- but even then... People put their lives in danger to bring their kids here for a good education. I will say this-- our people don't like elitism which is different from being an intellectual. If you read Hunger of Memory by Richard "El Vendido" Rodriguez-- you can see that all his trauma is not about being 'smart' but that he had ego and elitism issues from early on. It wasn't even so much as him being gay that caused problems-- but that he's always thought he was better than his parents. Which is a whole different thing.

elenoreflores
elenoreflores

I think this question is too stupid to answer. 

Kourtney Brown
Kourtney Brown

Plebe Lokillo my comment was a response to another post were the person stated Indian+Spanish = Mexican

Juan Flores
Juan Flores

This is news to me! I know plenty of Mexican sissies that are not educated! And I know plenty of educated Mexicans that are not sissies!

DonAlbertoDoyle
DonAlbertoDoyle

It's certainly not a phenomenon confined to Mexicans/Latinos.  I had several black friends in college whose accents and demeanors would shift when we went to hang out in their old neighborhoods -- they claimed they had to "N***** Up", or else be treated with scorn.  My mother used to tell the same story about the way the Shanty Irish regarded the Lace Curtain Irish in the twenties and thirties, that it was considered rather precious and affected to seek a college education and to talk without that Boston twang in your diction, the stevedores and bricklayers taunting the college boys.  But when all is said and done, a better life for one's children is worth the risk of sissification, no?

Lynn Maners
Lynn Maners

Without education, you have to rely on hard work, luck or windfalls...

Luis Uriostegui
Luis Uriostegui

It's people like George Lopez that made us all look like incompetent, ignorant people. George Lopez once said that we need our own "Jessi Jackson" to fight for us and speak for us. Followed by a "mas puto" comment by having some one with education. Sad part about it is that our own "Jessi Jackson" can be him since he's loved by most.

Lisa Mendoza
Lisa Mendoza

Education - whether formal or informal - changes people. That's kind of the whole point of education. When we are exposed to new ideas, new information our perspective changes. Many people, especially Americans, perceive people with new ideas as a threat. In America (most of the rest of the world has evolved beyond this point), the educated believe they have more value. They believe, that in a discussion, their knowledge/perspective trumps. With Mexicans in America it becomes a little more complicated because education is a form of assimilation. In the past it has been used as a method of genocide. Along with education, comes socialization. This is the real problem for Mexicans in America.

Ryan Lokillo
Ryan Lokillo

@KourtneyBrown: May I remind you being Mexican is a nationality. Most of it is European+Native. And it depends on the regions too.

Candace Mendoza
Candace Mendoza

all in a nutshell it doesnt matter who u are education is so important if u want to get any where in life

BillxT
BillxT topcommenter

You mean this is a humanity thing, not "race"? Wash your mouth out!

BillxT
BillxT topcommenter

With education, you have to rely on hard work, luck or windfalls ..., but you've hedged your bets.

 
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