Hotel Chevalier is only 13 minutes long, but it's as rich as a novel. The atmosphere is controlled—practically the whole thing takes place in a hotel room and its adjoining balcony—but Anderson lets danger and mystery in, more so than in any of his other movies. Hotel Chevalier is less a pure Wes Anderson film than a zephyr of Truffaut being channeled through Anderson; Schwartzman is his Antoine Doinel, a bundle of nerves in search of love in spite of himself. Anyone who can make a Hotel Chevalier must still have some surprises up his sleeve. Someday Wes Anderson might use his technical mastery, his sense of total control, to make a live-action movie that shows how little in life any of us can really control. It will be an adventure; it will be dangerous. And it will breathe.

Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave and Tony Revolori as Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel
Ralph Fiennes as M. Gustave and Tony Revolori as Zero in The Grand Budapest Hotel
Tilda Swinton behind the scenes of The Grand Budapest Hotel
Tilda Swinton behind the scenes of The Grand Budapest Hotel

Details

See also:
"Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel: A Marzipan Monstrosity" by Stephanie Zacharek.
"Getting Diorama Hard With Wes Anderson's The Grand Budapest Hotel" by Amy Nicholson.




Subscribe to the Voice Film Club podcast

Follow Stephanie Zacharek on Twitter at @szacharek.

« Previous Page
 |
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
All
 
My Voice Nation Help
1 comments
mannybanny
mannybanny

Great art evokes emotion in the viewer. It doesn't have to be a positive emotion.

If you don't get that from an Anderson movie, I don't know what to say to you, except 'what the cuss!'

 

Now Showing

Find capsule reviews, showtimes & tickets for all films in town.

Box Office Report

Join My Voice Nation for free stuff, film info & more!

Loading...