The Norbertine Code

Monks and canyon dwellers go mano a mano in Silverado Canyon

Following Eadie's lead, Mike Huff, a certified arborist and forester, attempted to quell concerns that Rutter Development's project ties a yellow noose around 151 oak trees. Huff told the commission that most of the trees in the area were damaged in recent fires and not good candidates for relocation. "Oaks can be relocated, but it's not an ecological or really a very humane thing to do to the oak, to be honest," he argued. The developer's proposal includes preserving 75 percent of the current oaks and planting 281 replacement trees, so that in 10 years, the area would boast 2,000 healthy trees.

Planting trees isn't the only way Rutter Development has offered to help county officials. According to the county Registrar of Voters, the developer pitched in $1,700 to Patricia Bates' 2010 campaign for election in the Fourth District, as well as $1,800 each—the maximum allowed under law—to Supervisors Shawn Nelson and Janet Nguyen in their most recent campaigns and Spitzer, who rolled over Deborah Pauly to take the Third District seat on the heels of his 2010 firing as a senior prosecutor in the Orange County district attorney's office.

Spitzer, whose oversight will include the proposed project site, did not return phone messages seeking comment about development in the canyons. But a canyon man who has been more than willing to speak out about Rutter Development's project was at the Planning Commission meeting to rebuke Eadie and Saddle Crest.

Chandos also appeared at the commission meeting, as though he were a legendary prizefighter, and delivered several haymakers on behalf of his group, which first petitioned the county to establish what became the Foothill-Trabuco Specific Plan. "The proposal before you is a case of the tail wagging the dog, the tail being a single development project and the dog being the entire Foothill-Trabuco Specific Plan and the Orange County General Plan," Chandos said.

Speaking for many canyon residents, Chandos argued that Rutter Development's proposal is a radical, far-reaching overhaul of these longstanding policies. They fear such amendments would open the door for developers to run roughshod over the rest of the county's open spaces. "I can't imagine a better recipe for widespread planning anarchy and confusion," Chandos told the commission.

Shortly after the meeting, Chandos admitted that the long battle against development in the canyons has wearied him and others who continue to fight. "It's very time-consuming," he says. "We're all paying for it in time taken from work, the lawyer bills. We've got lawsuits going. We have to sue the county all the time. We have made progress in getting around 1,000 acres since the plan was passed, so that's been encouraging."

* * *

The canyon roads are busy now, as summer invites visitors to cycle, hike or drive along the same routes laid down long ago by those who shared the same love for the land, with its faithful landscapes and surprising treasures. The long days awake to songs of native birds and the rustlings of predators and prey. Broiling afternoons buzz and moan with the sound of motorcycles and a steady stream of cars.

Smisek says canyon people are a unique breed. Sure, they scrap as though they're wildcats when it comes to development issues, but when a disaster such as flooding or fire hits, they come together quicker than anyone else he knows. But anti-development folks have a Chicken Little attitude about any talk of development, he says. "It's the old 'not in my back yard' attitude," he explains. "Now that we're here, we don't want anybody else here."

As evening falls on the canyons, their visitors, renewed by the life-giving panoramas and discovered-again landmarks, head home, perhaps to the coast or the sprawl of their native cities. The tired sun drowns in the west as the canyons flicker with headlights, until the footfall of man quiets and the night creatures live again.

Then Smisek asks a question that can be answered a thousand ways—or no way at all.

"Save the canyons?" he asks. "What are we saving them from?"

 

This article appeared in print as "The Great Monk Invasion: Does a Norbertine monastery in Silverado Canyon spell doom for God's country?"

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41 comments
Grace O'Malley
Grace O'Malley

The Silverado folks should not be angry with St. Michael's Abbey. Instead, they should be angry with the Holtz family, who sold their farmland to developers years ago. If anyone wanted to keep that land vacant, they should have bought the land at that time & donated it to the city or county. The people who are complaining now should "put their money where their mouth is," buy that land from St. Michael's & donate it to the city of Silverado.

Lwalker
Lwalker

Eamador's one-day old blog (which is posted out of chronological order) says that his comments about the Abbey being a “sever injury and fatality, a cancer. . .” were misquoted. So if Mr. Amador is correct, did OCW libel him? Or if Mr. Amador is incorrect, and he did make that statement, perhaps Mr. Amador;s latest blog libels OCW! So OCW, any comment? Do you stand by Mr. Amador's quote in your article or was he misquoted?

Carynb
Carynb

I recently moved to the canyon, and I had no idea...How a community could except anyone with open arms. I have never seen it in my life time. The landscape is so serene, and breath taking, that you don't even realize you are home. I feel that every day. I just want outsiders to know that 1. the speed limit is 25...no matter if you are a car, walker, or bicker, cyclist. 2. don't touch. 3. Waive HI and enjoy the beauty that surrounds you

TBickley
TBickley

So Tom are you suggesting that the developed areas of OC are free from backward characters, alcoholics and drug addicts? You've got to be kidding me.

Tommcmurray
Tommcmurray

I absolutely welcome this development. Silverado Canyon has been "Left Behind" the rest of Orange County in terms of becoming a modern, safe, upstanding community. I drive my car, ride my bike and walk through this canyon every year. I have encountered many, many backward characters, from alcoholics to flat out drug addicts. Let the Development come! The Catholics will surely raise the spiritual well being of this backward canyon. Let's "Grow Up" Silverado Canyon. This time is now. Thomas MacMurray

Ed Teach
Ed Teach

In paragraph 5 of this article, the author mentions that the Holtz Family farmed their land from about 1900 to 1980. They ploughed the land, dug wells, planted orchards, raised crops, built barns & chicken coops, etc. In paragraph 14 the Holtz Ranch is described as "one of the last remaining pieces of O.C's wildlands." Wildland?!? The property has only been vacant for 32 years. What's so "wild" about that?

Jim Hook
Jim Hook

Saint Michael's Abbey has been around since A.D. 1180. They have survived fires, floods, wars, invasions, Muslims, Nazis, Communists. It looks like they have time on their side....

Ed Teach
Ed Teach

Saint Michael's Abbey mailing address (not location) has been "Silverado CA 92676" for many years. The only reason little Silverado Canyon still has a post office is because of the large amount of incoming mail for St. Michael's Abbey. Just ask the Post Office staff ... they will tell you. No ... actually they won't say anything ... they are afraid of getting their tires slashed & homes spray-painted by "environmentalists."

Tibor Machan
Tibor Machan

It is not an invasion when you purchase land fair and square and build your abode on it. Calling it that is insulting--did you invade where you live now? Did your friends, parents, and so forth invade their current residences? Must you be of a certain religion these days to come to by property and live in Silverado Canyon?

Bob
Bob

It's equal opportunity.

Lwalker
Lwalker

If these Silverado people want to control everybody's use of the canyons, then we should stop supporting them every time they have a disaster. Let's stop spending county money up there and let them take care of their fires, floods and mudslides by themselves.

mesa short sales
mesa short sales

The Fullerton City Council's most recent action on the matter was to send the development agreement to voters in November. But this time, the canyon people insist they're ready.

mesa short sales
mesa short sales

The canyon people know each turn and can name the ghosts of those who once walked their dusty curves—and, along the way, built a little paradise among the oak trees, California poppies and Mariposa lilies.

Virginia
Virginia

While this is a very creative and entertaining piece of journalism it is quite unfortunate that it is written to entice the reader to believe that the opinion of ALL folks who live in the canyon is being represented. There is a very large, although silent majority of educated residents that love this canyon we call home but do believe in owner property rights. None of us want to see a typical downtown development, but threatening of property owners, the County, the Board of Supervisors etc. certainly isn't conducive to peaceful canyon living. These radical anti-development groups have already cost taxpayers thousand of dollars including putting the Silverado Modjeska Recreation Parks District at risk over a prior judgement against this property. Enough is enough many canyon residents say! We have already lost our school, restaurant, local canyon markets and our post office is in jeopardy of closing as we don't have a large enough population to support thriving commerce anymore. Quoting an odd statement in the article made by Mr. Amador, "It's real simple. It's a severe injury and fatality, a cancer the county's been put of alert about." One might respond by saying.... be careful what you wish for in threatening the County who provides resources and assistance especially during times of disaster. Silverado may soon be on the list of abandoned California Ghost Towns...

Mike Kennedy
Mike Kennedy

A few years ago, my fiance, my two young kids and I started off on a hike up Black Star Canyon Road. After a few minutes, this guy in a pickup pulled alongside us and demanded to know what we were doing there. I politely told him we had checked beforehand and were told it was a public road, and we were just hiking. With that, he became very angry, jumped out of his truck and said, "Some people who have gone up this road have been shot at, and folks are pretty good shots out here." And with that, he pushed forward his truck's seat cushion to reveal a rifle. I told him we didn't want any trouble, and that we had read in the OC Register that it was a scenic hike, and we also checked beforehand with the Sheriff's Department. He said he didn't give a damn what the Sheriffs said, that they weren't welcome either. And so, we turned around and went back down the road as he shadowed us. I was scared, but mostly for my children and fiance. This guy was freaky. When we got to a phone, I called 911, but the Sheriff's Department said people were often threatened on that road by residents, that even Deputies had been threatened. I asked if they would send out a Deputy because of the guy brandishing a firearm, and they said no. That place is like another planet right in the middle of Orange County. Good luck to the Norbertine Fathers.

Protocel
Protocel

The canyon people know each turn and can name the ghosts of those who once walked their dusty curves—and, along the way, built a little paradise among the oak trees, California poppies and Mariposa lilies.

fnpfan
fnpfan

So, an “open air museum” would be better than a secluded abbey? I’d take an abbey over a museum any day—a public attraction would obviously be worse for the traffic on the “teeny, little, already-dangerous, very-busy road with lots of bicycles on the weekend.”

Pat Hunt
Pat Hunt

What do I want to save our canyons from? From the real "terrorists" who want to cut down trees, grade hills, pollute streams, destroy natural habitats, drive away God's creatures and erase the beauty He created-all for profit. I enjoy sharing the beauty of the canyons with anyone who appreciates and respects this wonderful place we live in whether they are residents, bicyclists, hikers or just out for a drive. I feel truly blessed and believe we owe it to future generations to preserve this beautiful land we call home.

Tomsmisek
Tomsmisek

I am all for saving open space... buy it and save it. Don't expect property owners to pay taxes on land you would like to use Tom

jac
jac

I highly encourage everyone to get their facts straight. St. Michael's Abbey has a wonderful website that includes scientific studies, renderings of propsed buildings, a Q&A section, a geological map that is quite interesting, and an invitation to visit the current Abbey. The monks are being more than generous in their offer to SMRPD in reference to the Rivera. The author of the article did research on how the Monks came to the US, but the research into the project was not reflected in the article. If the activists are quoting the Sil-Mod Plan,they need to refer to 2 sections in the plan. Page 1 paragraph 2 states"In calculating densities or lot sizes allowable under this plan, gross acreage should be used; all references to acreage in this text means GROSS acres. Then proceed to page 4 Section titled Planned Community Opportunities, the first sentence states "Three areas are identified for possible "Planned Communities" at higher densities than those on the Specific Plan Land Use Map: HOLTZ RANCH- Medium density (3.5-5.0 du/ac). Since the Holtz Ranch is 320 acres that means the Sil-Mod Plan allows 1120 to 1600 residences to be built on the ranch. Most "Planned Communities" also have churches, schools and athletic fields within them. Be happy the Abbey is not looking to build what they are allowed to under the Sil-Mod Plan because no one wants what the plan actually allows. The Holtz Ranch is zoned Agi-1. Under that current zoning Churches, Schools and Sports fields are allowed. You can oppose the Abbey being built on the Holtz Ranch but do it based upon other reasons then it violates the Sil-Mod Plan because it doesn't. Also, don't say you are the voice of the canyon, as there are most likely more people in the canyon that you do not represent.

missmolly
missmolly

I didn’t know this was going on, so I really appreciate the coverage and the detailed background information. After taking all of it in… I’m still having trouble understanding what the big deal is. There’s obviously no shortage of passion, not to mention different perspectives, in this community, but it seems they’re making a mountain out of a molehill. The Fathers want to create a place of solitude and keep over half of the site as open space? Makes a lot of sense to me.

Month5
Month5

You haven't read their plan. Housing for students whose parents will be dropping them off and pick them up every weekend, housing for 85 men less than half of whom will be working on sight, the rest commute to jobs of site or are unaccounted for, 250 to 300 attendees at Sunday services, too many building to count when you start looking at maintenance buildings and other support structures, an screening the beautiful existing view from the road. Most of the traffic will be on weekends which is when the road is busiest with bicycles, motorcycles, and other outdoor enthusiasts. They claim to want to be good neighbors, but their actions speak louder than their words.

DC Wooldridge
DC Wooldridge

Gym, high school, athletic fields. Doesn't sound much like cloistered monks busy growing grapes in some Sound of Music narvana. Traffic will clog the Canyons already busy roads. John Michael Covas is right about the impact on county resources and the need to move cautiously without playing follow the leader.

Gina
Gina

We’re talking about a reclusive group of monks like they’re a threat to our existence. Emotions run high when people’s homes and quality of life are involved, but honestly, I can’t think of a better occupant for that land. I think time will show all the sky-is-falling rhetoric is silly.

RT
RT

There are clearly two sides to every story. Tom Smisek thoughtfully represented the opinions of many reasonable folks in the canyons who believe that the Fathers are a great fit for both this property and this community. Thank you, Tom, for telling our side of the story and giving us a voice.

Eamador
Eamador

Look there is Measure M Funds to help the Norbertine Fathers. These poor guys have fell in the same trap the last 3 major developers have : The County tells the developer its ok to build but the local taxpayers and homeowners say: "NO!" This has been happening since 1977. A Conservation alternative is needed as local land use policy is very poorly handled in rural Orange County.

Lora Roberts
Lora Roberts

go build a commercial building some where commercial, not rural..........if houses are too much for the environment,, then this certainly is...

Hmgrande
Hmgrande

Unfortunately the plan for the Norbertine development is extremely unsympathetic to the site and the character of the canyons. Incredibly poor site planning turned what could have been a project (on a smaller scale) that the community might have welcomed. One that was spread and more hidden that better preserved the land and made the development blend in to the environment. The strip mall mentality of the current plan is boiler plate. I am commenting as a planning professional with a Masters Degree in Urban and Regional Planning and a specialty in Environmental Planning. I think we all would prefer the site to be donated as open space to save the remaining habitat. However, posting no tresspassing signs, requiring lease agreements for parking for events on the Riveria are further alienating residents away from this development as is the plan. I hope we are saving the canyons for future generations so others can enjoy the lifestyle that is quickly disappearing in the OC. I like most others would like to see the Ranch remain undeveloped. And by the way, I am a Catholic.

Chalynn Marie Peterson
Chalynn Marie Peterson

It is easier to throw out the term "NIMBY" than it is to sit down and look at the facts. OC open space is shrinking acre by acre. Someone needs to hold back the dozers and keep balance. The environmentally minded canyon residents also happen to be the hosts of the recreational hikes, rides & nature walks, as well as outreach events that lure the city dwellers out of their stucco homes and into the woods.

Chalynn Marie Peterson
Chalynn Marie Peterson

Great in depth article Josh...wow...did your homework! Funny how Tom sees environmentalists as "whackos" who wouldn't bat an eyelash at endangering their reputations and jobs for childish malicious activity. Surprised he didn't give his usual response "Bigger houses make better people". I do hope that Todd Spitzer comes out in favor of our specific plans and helps OC Planning remember their role in developing the plans with the people of the canyons. We need to start seeing the land through the eyes of the creatures who need it for survival and also people like Joel Robinson who teach others to love and respect it...it is the last of the wild OC.

L May
L May

Thanks, Tom. Nice to know you draw the line somewhere. Everyone, chant with Tom and me "no Walmarts in Silverado!". It would be nice if people who don't support the Sil-Mod Specific Plan would stop the name calling. The biggest myth about those of us who seek to preserve the Specific Plan is that "we got ours and don't want anyone else out here". NOT TRUE! New residents are welcomed with open arms. In the 16 years I've lived here there have always been houses for sale. Nobody is stopping anyone from buying one of those. What we don't like is someone moving in here because the love the rural nature so much, then want to change it all.

marty108
marty108

Ed, are you saying the church should fund our local post office for services because of the lack of taxes they pay that benefits the community?  I think your on to something.

Eamador
Eamador

Virgina I was misquoted I did not say that and aplogize if you were upset. Tom Sismek and I are friends and we bumped into each other at the post office and we both agreed this article really put this issue "out there" but we were misquoted in the article.

marty108
marty108

Yes we did, and that is exactly what we signed up for.  

marty108
marty108

Well said Pat.  I don't think we are asking anything more or less then the way we live.  

 

Work around the environment don't make the environment work around you. 

 

Turn your lights off at night.

I Remember
I Remember

As an appointed (NOT elected) parks board member, Tom, you really need to brush up on Measure M.

Eamador
Eamador

In 2010 the Inter Cyn League sent Sheriff Hutchins a letter stating canyon roads including the one to the Abbey project is on are: "Hazardous, narrow... creates dangerous/disruptive conditions for motorist and bicylist" With the Abbey's total capacity for car traffic is for 726 people. This increases a dangerous condition Both the OC General Plan and the Sil-Mod Plan agree that the Canyons "shall" remain rural in character. Increasing a dangerous traffic condition is not rural in character.

marty108
marty108

Please turn your lights off at night so we can see the stars.  That's what some of are asking for.  

 

We all should be able to view the window into the gods. 

JohnMichael Covas
JohnMichael Covas

One thing that no one has mentioned is the fact that the property while valued at $6.1 million (according to the OC Weekly) is now off the tax rolls because religious organizations pay no real estate taxes in California. If the property were assessed at anywhere near that figure the county would collect some where in the neiborshood of sixty grand in taxes. The property will probably house close to a hundred and fifty residents (including the students) and will consume scarce county resources for law enforcement, fire protection and other general fund disbursements. That means in reality that either services are going to be reduced because of lack of money or that the money is going to be made up by increased real estate taxes on the residents of the canyon. That's not very neighborly, Abbot Hayes. I have lived in silverado canyon for almost 40 years and I know Tom Smisek and let me point out that Mr. Smisek, the self-appointed honorary sheriff of silverado, has never met at development project in these canyons that he didn't like.

truth=peace
truth=peace

Obviously, an ant walking across the landscape needs an acre to move!! Come on. I think there is more bigotry here than meets the eye. If a school for Environmentalism was put on this site in the same exact format as the monks layout (who by the way - own the property) you would all change your tune. Sounds like the "ant" or in this case "frog" is more important than a human? Hmmm. What creatures are inhibited by your dwellings being where they are in the canyon? The shoe is on the other foot now!

Ed Teach
Ed Teach

The Holtz Ranch is "... the last of the wild OC"??? It was a farm/ranch for 80 years. It has only been vacant for 32 years. You call that "wild"?

 
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