Letters From OC Weekly Readers

Letters may be edited for clarity and length. E-mail to, or mail to Letters to the Editor, c/o OC Weekly, 2975 Red Hill Ave., Ste. 150, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. Or fax to (714) 550-5908.

Regarding the cover photo [“OC’s Sexiest Cities,” Feb. 12]: three whites, one black and an Asian. Did Gustavo Arellano and the P.C. police approve the cover without it having any “spicy Latinas” or Hispanics?

Sara the Jew, Huntington Beach, via


No more booze for you. That was the most screwed-up list I’ve ever read. Garden Grove! Long Beach! What did John McEnroe say? [Something like], Are you serious???????

Dean Slater, San Clemente, via


Very funny list . . . except LBC is not OC.

Dwayne, Fountain Valley, via


Jesus, people, you all work for the county-boundary survey team? I think “next-door-neighbor-with-benefits, Long Beach” [in the intro] is a perfect explanation of their inclusion. Maybe I’m just psyched that my home and work cities are numeros 1 and 2.

Mr. Justin, AnaSlime, via


As a former OC dweller, now once-a-year visitor to the Orange Curtain, I’d say the sexiest women are at Starbucks in Corona del Mar (weekends) and Fascist Island Mall. So, I’d say Newport Beach/Corona del Mar could compete with any sexy European/Mediterranean hottie spot. However, compared to Newport, the city of Anacrime is more of a “blend-in place,” where beasts and other hoofed mammals graze.

Smokey, Athens, Greece, via

If the article is accurate [R. Scott Moxley’s Moxley Confidential, “More Empty Testimony,” Feb. 12], there is absolutely no excuse for the alleged conduct of the two sheriff’s deputies. Internal Affairs (IA) should be all over this case, and if substantiated, the deputies should be fired. In law enforcement, there is only one thing worse than lying in court—that is lying in court and getting caught. The rule in most police departments is “You lie, you die,” meaning, you lose your job. If the sheriff is going to keep cleaning up her department, the IA process must be tough as nails and questionable people must be eliminated.

Ltpar, Irvine, via


Bad cop, bad cop, what’cha gonna do when they come for you?

Justiceforfew, Orange, via

I have read your article [Nick Schou’s “Sawdust-Up,” Jan. 29] and letters and have 2 cents to submit—and possibly add to the editorial “toll-free”—or is it a “free-for-all”?

First of all, I resent any innuendo that in the early days, all we did was sit around smoking pot. There were those of us who had children to feed and gardens to tend. This was serious business and income for most of the “pioneers” I have known.

[Letter-writer] Maggie Spencer has only been in the show for 15 years, while I have been an exhibitor since 1973. Maybe I have seen things she does not know about, and just maybe her lack of “intelligence” has affected her opinions.

The Sawdust Festival deserves a full-time manager. The corporation pays well for one who is both qualified and honest.

As for the firings and the resignations, [former sales manager] Jay Grant told me years ago he was planning on retiring. To now blame his resignation on [general manager] Tom Klingenmeier or the board is unfair.

However, the firing of [former office manager] Jennifer Tye was totally unfair and a misstep for the fledgling manager. She should be rehired immediately with back pay.

The current board shamed themselves on the last morning of the last day of last summer’s show. Not even one abstention from the new board members. Members be damned.

[Former security chief] Billy Horner is a nice and gentle soul, and his wife and he were assets to our family. I had hoped that the offended would have been willing to withdraw all “legalese.”

I do not know if this would have helped Billy’s cause, but I will buy him a season ticket for next summer’s show if he wants me to.

And, editor, we are not fighting (as your title insinuated); we are growing. That is why the Sawdust remains the best and most-original art-and-craft festival in the nation. It’s more than a whimsical art-and-craft exhibit; it’s a village.

Ken Denton, Laguna Beach, via mail

Overall, you have a fun, informative publication. However, I felt confused and nauseated by the commercial portrayal of Rodney Alcala’s “murderous romp through polite society” [Christine Pelisek’s “The Fine Art of Killing,” Jan. 22]. I strongly feel that the need to sensationalize news for consumer appeal is grossly out of line here. This story is already shocking, yet the photos of feminine women mixed with fancy type—“The Fine Art of Killing”—came across as chillingly disrespectful of a devastating reality. I do not disagree with sharing this information, yet its deliverance added horror to the situation. What the hell were you thinking? It’s like romanticizing Columbine. Yuck.

Disturbed, via mail