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He does worry, though. “The lonchera industry is like a carousel,” he says. “Everyone visits the good, the bad, the okay. But it seems we’re stuck right now on the really bad.”

De la Cruz agrees. “This first stop we’re going to [a factory in Costa Mesa], when we first found it in February, we’d have 15 guys buy from us, all just stuffing their mouths,” he says, as Ramirez points to his watch. Time’s short. “Right now, we only sell to three workers, and they don’t buy as much as they used to. Everyone else got laid off. But as long as our customers want to eat, we’ll go there.”

“It’s a hard industry,” Guzmán says. “Many think it’s easy, but of 10 that enter, only one stays. But it’s a great one. All the world can stop cutting [their] hair, buying shoes, but eating food is essential. We help people with that. Our industry, it’s noble.”

Edward De la Cruz (left) and Joseph Ramirez, before the morning rush at International Catering in Irvine, one of OC's six officially licensed commissaries for taco trucks
Susan Sabo
Edward De la Cruz (left) and Joseph Ramirez, before the morning rush at International Catering in Irvine, one of OC's six officially licensed commissaries for taco trucks
Blessed Jesus of the mystical sope
Susan Sabo
Blessed Jesus of the mystical sope

garellano@ocweekly.com

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