[Special Screenings] Local Showings of 'Luke and Brie Are On a First Date,' 'The Godfather,' More

Movie Festival of the Week:

Zero Film Festival
The Zero Film Festival, which is dedicated to self-financed, zero-budget DIY filmmaking, ends its first West Coast tour at the historic Yost Theater in Santa Ana. Screening is Luke and Brie Are On a First Date, a “mumblecore” set in Los Angeles and featuring a cameo by Aaron Katz, writer/director of Dance Party, USA and Quiet City. In production assistant-turned-director Chad Hartigan’s feature debut, Luke (George Ducker) is a wannabe journalist who meets secretary Brie (Meghan Webster) at a bar for what may or may not be a first date. It’s obvious he’d like it to be, but she’s keeping things extremely casual. Working against Luke’s wish to maintain Brie’s constant gaze are three guys initially sharing a bar booth with the couple, two attractive dudes doling out free slices of Hawaiian-style pizza and a house full of other twentysomethings at a birthday kegger Luke gets dragged to. The night wears on like an entire relationship, with fits of mutual attraction, jealousy, intimacy, misunderstanding and opportunities for infidelity. Despite a cupboard-bare budget and a slow start that has you wondering why, exactly, you’re watching Luke and Brie Are On a First Date, stick it out because Ducker and first-time actress Webster, both of whom co-wrote the script with Hartigan, are naturals in front of the camera, and their chemistry is infectious. The fest also features a collection of “audience-choice award-winning shorts,” including writer/director Pamela Green’s Compact Only, which finds a fellow (John Poulos) jonesing so much for L&L Barbecue that he parks his black full-size car in a nearby shopping-center lot just so he will be within the required delivery area. As he scarfs down his lunch behind the wheel, he discovers what happens in a shopping-center parking lot is much more entertaining than anything on TV. Filmmakers attend the screenings, which are followed by a closing-night party featuring live performances by such Orange County bands as Dusty Rhodes and the River Band, the Living Suns, Voxhaul Broadcast, and the Growlers. Yost Theater, 307 N. Spurgeon St., Santa Ana, (206) 697-4821; zerofilmfest.com. Sat. Films, 7:30 p.m.; music, 9:30 p.m. $8-$10. All ages.

Also Showing:

 

A Century of Quilts
The best 100 quilts of the 20th century—and the stories behind them—are presented. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Tues., 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

Desert Odyssey
A 9-year-old boy embarks on his first camel caravan through the Sahara. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Wed., 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

Eldorado
The Independent Film Series continues with Bouli Lanners’ look at two aimlessly wandering loners: Yvan, a quick-tempered 40-year-old vintage-car dealer, and Elie, a young burglar and ex-junkie. This screening is not recommended for children under 17. Fullerton Public Library, 353 W. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 738-6326; fullertonlibrary.org. Fri., 6:30 p.m. Free.

From Here to Eternity
If you just missed this screen adaptation of the James Jones novel on Turner Classic Movies, TiVo American Idol and head out to see Burt Lancaster, Monty Clift, Frank Sinatra, Deborah Kerr, Donna Reed, Ernest Borgnine and Jack Warden in this 1953 drama that picked up eight Oscars for making a soap opera out of American military life in Hawaii just before the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Cinema Fusion at Anaheim’s GardenWalk, 321 W. Katella Ave., Anaheim, (714) 399-0300; www.cinemafusionanaheim.com. Wed., 7 p.m. $7.50.

The Godfather
Paramount Pictures’ completely remastered print of the Francis Ford Coppola masterpiece is screened, as is a completely remastered print of its possibly greater sequel (see below). Based on Mario Puzo’s novel and screenplay, it follows the transition of a Sicilian-American crime family from its aging patriarch Don Vito Corleone (Marlon Brando) to his reluctant son Michael Corleone (Al Pacino, never again as catatonic). So much of this film is woven into popular culture that you know the plot even if you are among the few who have not seen it. However, a whole bunch of us were too young (or not yet born) when it first hit the big screen in 1972, so this is a rare chance to see a crisp print the way it was intended to be seen. If you can stick around or come back for Part II, all the better. Bay Theater, 340 Main St., Seal Beach, (562) 431-9988; www.baytheatre.com. Fri., Mon. & Wed., 7 p.m.; Sat.-Sun., 3 p.m. $5-$8.

The Godfather: Part II
If you took in part one and your butt and wallet can still take it (separate admissions are charged for each film), why not experience all 375 minutes of two of America’s greatest cinematic achievements? Part II tells the parallel stories (in more ways than one) of young Vito (Robert DeNiro) and, decades later, his son and rising mob boss, Michael (Al Pacino). Bay Theater, 340 Main St., Seal Beach, (562) 431-9988; www.baytheatre.com. Sat.-Sun., Tues. & Thurs., March 12, 7 p.m. $5-$8.

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