[Special Screenings] Local Showings of 'The Rocky Horror Picture Show,' 'A Clockwork Orange,' More

Movie of the Week:

The Rocky Horror Picture Show and A Clockwork Orange
Local midnight-movie fans will awake Sunday morning with bleary eyes after two consecutive nights of films that begin after Letterman’s monologue and Saturday Night Live’s opening skit. After years of weekly midnight screenings at cesspools of cinematic enjoyment such as the long-gone Mesa Theater, The Rocky Horror Picture Show returns to an Orange County big screen—and yes, audience members are welcome to bring toast, rubber gloves and cast wardrobe that allows one to not just dream it, but be it. Denton, Ohio-bound Janet (Susan Sarandon) and Brad (Barry Bostwick) get lost one rainy night and wind up at the castle of just another Sweet Transvestite from Transsexual, Transylvania—Dr. Frank-N-Furter (Tim Curry). It’s incredible this sexed-up, gender-bending, sci-fi/horror musical bombed so badly when it debuted in 1975 and yet has sold enough tickets since to bail out Wall Street. Twenty-four hours and four minutes after Rocky starts, Mondo Midnights at the Art presents Stanley Kubrick’s 1971 horrific mind-bender about very-bad-boy Alex (Malcolm McDowell), who engages in a bit of the old ultra-violence, goes to jail, and then is electroshocked into model citizenship. Possibly. Like Rocky, Clockwork’s got catchy music (“Singin’ in the Rain”), characters in outrageous getups and invitations for audience participation. Dress as your favorite Droog and get half off admission. Just leave your runny Frank mascara on from the night before and put on a bowler, and you’ll be fine. The Rocky Horror Picture Show at South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701; www.regencymovies.com. Fri., 11:55 p.m. $7-$10. A Clockwork Orange at Art Theatre, 2025 E. Fourth St., Long Beach, (562) 428-5435; www.mondocelluloid.com. Sat., 11:59 p.m. $9.50.

Also Showing:

Africa, The Serengeti. Stunning visuals and James Earl Jones’ booming narration tell the story of the Great Migration, in which the greatest concentration of wildlife on the planet treks more than 500 miles in search of food and water every year. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Wed., 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

The Art of Quilting. The hourlong documentary explores the myriad of techniques and artistry reflected in contemporary American quilts. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Tues., 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

The Crowd. King Vidor’s 1928 silent masterpiece about a mundane couple plodding along—until tragedy strikes. Howard Cowles provides live piano accompaniment at this UC Irvine Film and Video Center joint. UC Irvine, Humanities Instructional Building, Room 100, Lucille Kuehn Auditorium, Campus & W. Peltason drs., Irvine, (949) 824-7418; www.humanities.uci.edu/fvc. Thurs., Jan. 29, 7 p.m. $3-$5.

Dark Days. The Road Less Traveled store continues its Conscious Cinema (screened next door) with this 2000 documentary that took Marc Singer underground to live with a “family” of squatters who've survived several years near Penn Station, next to the Amtrak tracks. @Space Gallery, 2202 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 836-8727; theroadlesstraveledstore.com. Sun., 5:30 p.m. Free admission and hot tea. 

A Hard Day’s Night. Director Richard Lester’s better-than-it-needed-to-be, 1964 Fab Four vehicle reminds us what all the Beatlemania fuss was about. South Coast Village, 1561 W. Sunflower Ave., Santa Ana, (714) 557-5701; www.regencymovies.com. Wed., 7:30 p.m. $6.50.

Hearts and Hands. Pat Ferrero’s documentary on 19th-century quilt makers and the social history reflected in their work. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Sat. & Thurs., Feb. 5, 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

In Love We Trust. Monthly indie film showings continue with Wang Xiaoshuai’s 2007 look at a divorced couple who learn that the only way to save their dying daughter is to have another child. Fullerton Public Library, 353 W. Commonwealth Ave., Fullerton, (714) 738-6334; www.fullertonlibrary.org. Fri., 6:30 p.m. Free.

Leopards of Zanzibar. Young men on the sunny island of Zanzibar step onto mainland Africa and into modernity for a championship soccer match. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Fri., 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

Oliver Kahn. This 2003 film is named after the famous soccer player from Bayern Munich, but instead of a biopic, viewers get a montage of European fútbol moments to question how memory is constructed and/or reconstructed. UC Irvine, University Art Gallery, 712 Arts Plaza, Irvine, (949) 824-9854. Open Tues.-Sat., noon-5 p.m. Through Feb. 7. Free.

Quilts in Women’s Lives. Documentarian Pat Ferrero presents first-person narratives by seven renowned female quilt makers. Bowers Museum of Cultural Art, 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana, (714) 567-3600; www.bowers.org. Thurs., Jan. 29, 1:30 p.m. Free with paid admission ($9-$12).

Reversion. UC Irvine’s Film and Video Center kicks off the two-film “Women Direct Movies” series with Mia Trachinger’s 2008 tale about a woman named Eva, who is desperately trying to avoid a destiny in which she kills her lover, Marcus. “Part gritty road movie, part lo-fi science fiction, part love story, Reversion traverses the sprawling landscape of Los Angeles in search of fate, free will and the nature of morality,” writes Fatimah Tobing Rony, the UCI film- and media-studies professor who curates this screening, which is preceded by a reception and followed by a question-and-answer session with Trachinger. The series, which concludes Feb. 26 with Indonesia’s Chants of Lotus (Perempuan Punya Cerita), seeks to explore why there are so few women directors and hero/protagonists in feature films. UC Irvine, Humanities Instructional Building, Room 100, Lucille Kuehn Auditorium, Campus & W. Peltason drs., Irvine, (949) 824-7418; www.humanities.uci.edu/fvc. Thurs., Feb. 5. Reception, 6:30 p.m.; screening, 7 p.m. $3-$5.

 

Mail your press releases (and a videotape or disc, if available) to Special Screenings, OC Weekly, 2975 Red Hill Ave., Ste. 150, Costa Mesa, CA 92626. Or send e-mail to edewitt@ocweekly.com. All materials must be received at least two weeks before the screening.

 
My Voice Nation Help
0 comments
Sort: Newest | Oldest
 

Now Showing

Find capsule reviews, showtimes & tickets for all films in town.

Powered By VOICE Places

Box Office

Scores provided by Rotten Tomatoes

Join My Voice Nation for free stuff, film info & more!

Loading...